promotional merchanidse

Promotional products are an industry that a lot of people don’t even realise exsist. Despite this, it is actually one of the largest marketing techniques that millions of businesses use in their strategies. They are items that are printed with a companies artwork and logos that are then given to customers who will see the branding for a long time to come. Whether they are sending out printed cotton bags out in the post, used as welcome gifts that are given out to new customers or sold to customers online or in the shop, they are a great way for businesses to convert prospects into customers and into repeat purchasers.

These are some “tried and true” ways to use promotional merchandise and are populare because they really do work. However, companies that have exhibited a certain amount of creativity when deciding what product to brand and how they eventually use those promotional products can be some of the most effective promotions ever run by the business and lead to a massive increase in sales. Creating the right strategy is key however and the examples below may be the inspiration you need to conjur up the idea that will work for your business.

Branding products specific to your industry

In order to create a positive buzz around your campaign you need to use a lot of creativity to make a product that is truly unique and attention worthy. The benefits of this should be clear as the more people who talk about it, the more people your campaign reaches and the greater brand exposure you receive. A fantastic example of this is when IAMS, the pet food company, promoted their produce as something that will increase your pets strength and health. One way they did this by producing bespoke frisbees that were designed to look like barbell weights. A very cute and quirky way to show that dogs will be stronger whilst being also being a great give away for pet lovers providing a practical use.

Competitions

Other ways you can get creative with promotional product is having competitions between customers and the public with the prizes being printed merchandise. This works better with high value products such as moleskin note pads and power banks. Something a little different and of a higher value may incentivise them to enter the competition. Perami did this by offering the public the chance to win a promotional toy of their mascot wearing football attire, to tie in to the World Cup. This got people talking about their brand while increasing sales as people wanted to get their hands on these limited edition toys.

Cross promotions

Crossovers have always been a popular aspect of media and this fact also stretches over to businesses. If two businesses work together to both promote eachother or to release a special item, customers tend to look at both companies in a positive light. This is especially prominent if the two companies are competitors as it shows that they are okay with putting the opposition between them aside to make something special. This is also great as this kind of collaboration is lilley to grab the attention of audiences and news outlets alike which will widen the reach of your promotions imensily. Perhaps the most famous example of this is the collaboration between Mcdonalds and Coke to release bespoke glasses for patrons to receive from macdonalds stores. It markets both businesses as people will want to go to Mcdonalds to get the free glass and Coke will receive the advertising that they will receive from the exposure of their branding.

There are so many different uses when it comes to promotional products. The diversity of products and different applications make it a form of marketing that can than help with almost any business in their marketing. Despite this, lots of businesses like to stay within the comfort zone and use them for methods that are very popular. While this is fair and likely to still be effective, some of the most talked about and successful promotions are ones that are different and creative. So don’t be afraid to try something new. It could do wonders for your brand recognition, sales and popularity.