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In addition to the general tips of being groomed and looking presentable for your interview, there are things that you’ll want to be sure of to help you stand apart from the rest in your marketing job interview.

Most interviewers today aren’t just looking to find someone who is qualified on paper to do the job. This is helpful, but you need to show passion for marketing, fit in with the culture of the marketing company that you’re trying to become a part of and display potential for growth at the company.

Research your potential employer: It will be fairly difficult to be appropriately passionate about your potential new company if you have no idea who they are or what they stand for. While a job is a job, if you are thinking along the lines of long-term, you should know what you’re joining up for. If you are knowledgeable about some of the company’s history, you will have a more solid foundation to construct your thoughts during the conversation.

Conversation style is how many interviews are conducted these days. Sure, an interviewer can ask you case-by-case questions, but because interviewers want to get to the heart of who you are, they are more likely to approach the interview as a discussion, rattle than have you rattle off from-the-book answers that anyone else could also say. By conducting a bit of research before your marketing interview, you can also ask more pointed questions about the position, and narrow down your projected career path. Employers like to see a long-term plan.

Prepare your materials: This is good advice for any interview, but especially for a marketing interview, you should bring samples of your writing or previous work. If you cannot provide tangible copies, be sure to highlight successes on your resume as talking points. Having successful project history can only contribute to your success as an interviewee, and the interviewer may remember you for a particular area the company might need help in.

Details on why a particular topic or pieces of a campaign are good to keep in mind. This will help make a unique impression for the interviewer on who you are and what makes up your drive. Listing your resume digitally is also key to being considered for a marketing interview in the first place. Utilizing a site like Edge Online to help bolster your resume with target keywords will help the company’s resume software tag yours.

Take a look at some example questions: For a marketing interview, the questions could be presented in a broad manner where the interviewer expects you to drive and guide to specific points, which helps them gauge your responsiveness, or they could be very specific, tailored to the kind of position they are interviewing for.

Searching Google for some example questions that are presented in either way will help you practice formulating your answers, and pinpointing your successes. Some questions could be about managing a marketing project, what your opinion of a successful campaign is, or a time when you incorporated something revolutionary to you into a campaign.

In addition, with the new interview approach for today’s positions, many interviewers might ask you for examples of failures. Usually, these are phrased as when a campaign that included you didn’t go wrong, and your opinion on that. Interviewers want to build a complete profile of you, and that includes areas that might be a struggle. Keeping an objective tone about successes and failures shows patience, a willingness to learn, and the ability to analyze key components, which might be you.

Summary

As far as interviews go, a marketing interview may tend to be on the more serious side. Dressing up in more business-oriented clothing will help your confidence and help you present yourself well. A job in the field of marketing is on the more rewarding and fun side because it is a career path that often calls on creativity and communication to be combined. These are areas that most people excel at if given a chance. Applying these tips to your marketing interview is sure to help you land the job.